Perfect Way To Upgrade Your Summer Blazer: Handcrafted Linen Pocket Squares – Fort Belvedere

Welcome to Fort Belvedere! In this video, we talk about the linen pocket squares with hand rolled X stitches. How they’re different from one another, how you can wear them and what makes them so unique. First of all, we have two different variations of linen. One is a more traditional linen which is softer yet still stiff enough to fold into a nice pocket square shape, but it’s more what you’re used to from a regular store. The other option is a so-called handcrafted linen which is handwoven. It has a very open weave which makes it very summery and casual. And if you look at the fabric itself, it has little knobs.

Some are thicker than others. It’s very transparent. It is stiffer and because of that we had to make that pocket square smaller. Why smaller? Basically, we design all of our pocket squares so they stay in your pocket without being too big. They will never disappear. They will never pop out. They’re just proportioned exactly the right way for your pocket. On top of that, all these pocket squares are hand rolled not just in a usual way but with an X stitch. That basically takes more than twice as long because the X’s have to be the same so they look harmonious and proportional. If you already have shoestring pocket squares with contrasting edges this is the next step.

It’s much rarer. You can really not find it made from China. These are made in Italy from Italian linen which is very high-quality. For the finer traditional linen, we offer it with a red X stitch as well as the navy X stitch. You can wear it with blazers or with business suits. It just adds a little bit of something extra to it. One of my favorite pocket squares is the pale yellow one with a pale yellow X stitch. It’s just summery, it’s subtle, it works well with pastel shirts and so does the brown and blue one with a brown base and blue X stitching.

On top of that we have our handcrafted linen. One in a burgundy red with white. It’s a very summery, very light fabric but you can also wear it with tweed jackets. Then we have a yellow one with a navy blue X stitch, which is different than the other yellow one that I mentioned before and so you can combine it with either your yellow and blue socks or maybe with elements in your jacket or your tie. The other version is a plain white even though it’s not a 100% white. It’s slightly more muted than that but it has light blue X stitching which is really great on summer blazers or sport coats. Last but not least, we have a blueish version of the handcrafted linen with a dark navy X stitch which goes really well with any kind of blue outfit.

It makes it a little more casual, a little more relaxed and a little more summery even though you could wear them during the fall especially with flannel and tweed jackets. For a full selection our pocket square head over to the shop here, where you can also find a pocket square with hand stitch dots which is kind of polka dot effect or with the suits when you play cards. Really great if you like poker or if you go to Vegas a lot. .

Should You Wear Cuffed Pants?

Welcome back to the Gentleman’s Gazette! In today’s video, we’ll discuss cuffed trousers and whether you should wear them or not. In recent years, cuffs, also known as turn-ups, have somewhat fallen out of favor with mainstream men. At the same time, it’s a very classic look that has been around for a long time and will likely also be a part of classic men’s wardrobe for the foreseeable future. First of all, what are trouser cuffs? Basically, it is a folded edge at the hem at the bottom and it looks like a turned-up edge that it’s added to the pant leg. Traditionally, a cuff is not cut but simply folded from excess fabric at the bottom hem. Because of that, if you will let out the cuffs, you could always create a longer pair of pants or trousers. When you do that, you usually don’t have enough fabric left to put a cuff back on.

In that case, you simply add a faux cuff meaning it is cut separately and then sewn on to give you a little more extra room when you’re short on fabric. For bespoke trousers or suits, you sometimes also see angled cuffs which is more difficult to do and they are always faux cuffs because you cannot have a continuous piece of fabric with a faux cuff. The benefit of the angled cuff is that you don’t have a break in the front, at the same time, the back part of the trouser leg reaches almost the heel which is very pleasing. You also reveal more of the shoe. Normally, cuffed trousers are all plain hemmed and to learn more about the proper trouser length, please check out this video here. On the formality scale, cuffed trousers are always less formal than pants without cuffs. Historically, the origins of cuffs stemmed from a time where you would turn up the bottom hem of your trouser in muddy weather. In 1890, the then Prince of Wales who later became King Edward the seventh introduced the permanent turn-up which was there just for fashion reasons and was not a necessity due to outside weather conditions.

Cuffed pants became the norm for businesswear between the 1890s and the 1940s. During World War II, there was a fabric shortage and so it was decided to forego the cuff or the turn-up so you could save on a fabric and create more garments instead. Ever since the 1950s, cuffed trousers have gone in and out of fashion but over the years, they’ve always remained, they’ve always come back and likely they will always come back even though they might not be super fashionable at this point in time. By the way, the British refer to cuffs as things you have on your sleeve versus on the pants or trousers, they’re called turn-ups. Sometimes Savile Row tailors also call them PTUs or permanent turn-ups. At the end of the day, they’re all the same and we use the terminology interchangeably in this video.

So when and where do you typically see cuffs on trouser hems? You definitely see them in suits and in Italy, I’d say the majority of suits will have the cuff. They’re also popular in white-collar professions with lawyers, bankers, and the like. Cuffs can help to make a suit silhouette to look more grounded especially when you have vertical stripes such as a pinstripe or a rope stripe. To learn more about stripes, please check out this guide here and for more about office wear or how to dress as a lawyer, please check out their respective guides. In terms of the seasons, you can find cuffs anywhere from flannel suits or tweed suits all the way up to summery seersucker suits. In the collegiate realm, cuffs are favored by people who are interested in trad style and you can learn more about that style here. On the other hand, if you’re more a follower of the preppy style you’re more likely to just manually turn-up your uncuffed pants.

You guessed it, we also have a video on preppy style here. Cuffs are also often a feature on odd trousers or slacks that are worn to the office. Just think of the typical gray flannel pants with a navy blazer, for example, or other office outfits that are a bit more serious. When it comes to casual pants, you still may encounter turn-ups on chinos or khakis even though you can also find them without cuffs. When it comes to traditional workwear such as denim or jeans, you will not find a cuff because that would simply be impractical. In this day and age, a cuff on a pair of jeans would simply look weird. That aside, you can also find cuffs on shorts sometimes especially in the Bermudas, typically, they make it a little less formal so for most shorts, I don’t think they’re appropriate but it is an option that exists. To learn more about summer shorts, please check out this guide here.

So to cuff or not to cuff your pants, that is the question! The bottom line is cuffs or turn-ups are optional and it’s a personal style choice. For example in my suit collection, I have a bunch of suits with cuffs that are a little more casual, at the same time, I have three-piece suits that don’t feature cuffs whereas others do feature cuffs. The big advantage of cuffs is that it adds a bit more weight to the bottom part of your pants thus creating a nicer drape or hang of the trouser especially if you have pleated pants.

Of course, they also can help to create a visual balance, for example, for double-breasted suits or vertically striped suits but to learn more about pleated pants, please check out this video here. Cuffs definitely give you a slightly more traditional look and if you want a contemporary look with a slim fit, oftentimes, it’s better to forego the cuff for a cleaner silhouette. That being said, there’s one area where cuffs and turn-ups are always unacceptable from a historical point of view and that is formal wear. So you’ll never see cuffs on a proper tuxedo, a black tie ensemble, a white tie ensemble, or a morning coat.

Likewise, you also won’t encounter it with a stroller suit. For more details about Black Tie white tie or morning wear please check out our respective guides So if you’re buying trousers that are not for a formal occasion, should you add cuffs or not? At the end of the day, if you’re undecided, I always argue in favor of cuffs because you can always have them very easily removed at the alterations tailor. Think of it as an additional fabric that allows you to be creative with the size of your cuff but if you don’t like it, you can always get rid of it. On the flip side, if you decide against cuffs from the get-go and you later realize that the fabric is too flimsy and you would like to have a cuff in there, it’s very difficult to add one back on because most of the time, there’s not enough fabric left even for a faux cuff.

So if you decide to go with cuffs on your trousers or slacks, here are a few tips to wear them well. First of all, for a true cuff, you always need a plain hem and you want the front just to slightly touch the top of your shoe. In general, cuffs look best if they just slightly touch your shoe without creating a deep break or any puddling around your ankle. So when in doubt, a cuffed pair of pants is always slightly shorter than an uncuffed pair of pants. Having too much excess fabric at the ankle paired with a cuff can just look sloppy. Also, if your pants have cuffs as well as pleats, the break can interrupt the nice crease and the nice line of the pair of trousers.

When you wear dress boots, make sure that the pants have enough space so they go over the boot and don’t just get caught on it, otherwise, you always have some puddling going on that’s very unsightly. In terms of cuff size, there is again no right or wrong. Historically, there has been anything from under one inch to all the way up to two and a half even three inches. As with most things in menswear, it pays to stay in the middle which is typically between one and a half inches or two inches. In the metric system, that’s about 3.5 or 3.75 centimeters and 5 centimeters. According to Alan Flusser, a traditional cuff size is 1 and 5/8 of an inch for men who are 5’10” or shorter. If you are taller than that, you should go with an inch and 3/4. Personally, I like it slightly larger so sometimes I have a two-inch cuff or slightly smaller something that’s also slightly bigger but it definitely is a bit more noticeable and if you want to go for a classic look, this guideline hits the nail on the head. Of course, you can also pay attention to other aspects in your suit.

Let’s say you have very wide lapels, you should not have a very slim cuff because it simply looks not proportional. Also, you can look at the height of your collar in the back of your neck of your jacket and try to match that to the size of your trouser cuff. So what are some good ways to get started with cuffs? I suggest you maybe start with a pair of chinos because you can wear them a little more casually and otherwise, you can also wear them with a suit including a solid navy suit which is quite formal for a suit but nevertheless, it can be worn with cuffs. If you don’t wear suits a lot, you could experiment with cuffs on slightly more casual pants such as flannel pants, tweed slacks, or linen pants. So in conclusion, it pays to have cuffed trousers in your wardrobe whether it was a really casual slacks that’s just chinos or slacks that are a part of a suit.

At the same time, you never want to add cuffs to very formal ensembles because they are simply not meant for that. When you opt for cuffs, go with a slightly shorter trouser length so you have a nicely hanging pair of pants and at the end of the day, the sky is the limit and your choice or preference decides on whether you have a lot of cuffs in your wardrobe or very few but it always pays to have at least a few pairs of pants with cuffs because it just gives you a complete wardrobe. So what about you, do you prefer pants with or without cuffs? Please share with us in the comments and if you enjoyed this video, give us a thumbs up and I’m sure you’ll also enjoy the other videos about trousers which you can check out here.

In today’s outfit I am wearing a combination of cuffed trousers in houndstooth with black and white as well as a green jacket that is part of a suit I combined it with a white dress shirt with French cuffs and cufflinks with an onyx stone from Fort Belvedere which go well with the silver buckle on the black double monk strap for my shoes my tie is purple with tones of green and orange which are picked up by the Pocket square as well as my socks you can find all three of those accessories in our shop here the cuffs on this pair of pants are about 2 inches or 5 centimeters which is just a style I personally like and the weight helps to create a nice silhouette for my trousers .

Business Casual Men’s Shoes & How To Wear Them

Welcome back to the Gentleman’s Gazette and our series on business casual clothing. Today, we discuss shoes and we go more in depth about different work settings and how you can put your best foot forward so you could look always stylish. If you have not already done so, please check out our general dress code guides or five different outfits and what to wear to the office here. Business casual today is one of the most widely spread dress codes yet it’s often vaguely defined. Because of that, we created an in-depth guide but the golden rule to keep in mind is that you always have to adapt to your company and the culture within. There’s no point in following all the advice we provide in our video if your company is extremely casual or extremely formal. You simply have to figure that out and the best way to do that is to observe what others are wearing or to ask your supervisor. Well-made shoes from quality leather that is expertly polished can really upgrade a cheap suit, at the same time, a cheap pair of shoes can bring down a $5,000 bespoke suit.

So first, let’s look at what business casual shoes mean in a context of traditional white-collar environments such as law firms. Because you’re on this traditional environment, chances are even business casual is more formal than in other places. Now that doesn’t mean that you should wear your black cap toe oxford because that would still be too formal and while it’s good with suits for business casual, you can be a bit more daring. For one that means wearing a derby shoe. Derbys have an open lacing system and because of that, they’re always slightly less formal than an oxford. Also, I would stay clear of black derbys, instead I would opt for brown ones because brown is one of those shades that has just a hundred or thousand different colors with little variations and so you can never have enough brown shoes. When I say brown I also mean red shoes, either reddish brown, burgundy, or oxblood. These are all fantastic colors for business casual even in a formal environment. My favorite derby shoe of mine comes in Burgundy, it’s made of a Parisian last which is still quite elegant and so I can work with a suit or for business casual very easily.

Alternatively, I could wear a burgundy monk strap, either in dark chocolate brown or maybe in red. Apart from that color scheme, I would not branch out into others because it would maybe be too casual for such a traditional environment. That means no gray shoes, no olive green shoes, stick with shades of brown and you’ll be good. Whether that’s a very dark brown, a medium brown, chestnut brown, or very light tan, is up to you but just keep in mind the lighter shade of brown, the more casual the shoe. Likewise, the more broguing you have on the shoe, the more casual it is. Apart from the color, leather texture can also have a huge impact on how it’s perceived.

For example, suede shoes are always softer and more casual. So for example, a dark brown suede shoe will look about as informal or casual as a regular polished leather tan shoe. Overall, it’s very important that your shoes work well not just with the rest of your outfit but with the socks and the pants in particular because they’re right next to your shoe. To learn how you can put together interesting outfits that work pretty well in a business casual environment please check out this video here. Second, let’s go a notch down and determine what business casual shoes look like in other traditional environments that are not quite as formal. If you work in the service industry, in sales, or other trade positions, chances are you still have client contact and even though it’s not required of you to be well dressed, and sometimes it may come off as aloof or not appropriate, people will still judge you and if you look frumpy in sweatpants with a hole that are all dirty, people will think less highly of you, they will assume that you’re less competent than if you would wear let’s say a nice dress shirt with a pair of chinos.

If you are just at the office and never have client contact, your employer will likely have specific ideas of what’s acceptable and what’s not. If that’s not your office, I suggest to just stay clear of sneakers because sneakers are quite casual. The same is true for tennis shoes, Nikes, Adidas, it’s simply not work appropriate shoes.Fine for gym not for the office. In this segment, one of my favorite colors is green which is highly underrated in menswear and I talk more about why and how in this video. Just think about adding a dark green oxford full brogue wingtip shoe in suede, it’s quite dark, people wouldn’t notice it right away yet it’s very different than a traditional dark brown wingtip oxford.

Alternatively, a nice olive green with a beautiful patina on an elegant long last is really something that will provide a lot of contrast with the pants and slacks you’re wearing therefore, it’ll stand out in a way but it’s still subtle enough that it could be mistaken for a dark brown shoe at first glance. In recent years, dress shoes uppers with white rubber or sneaker soles have become extremely popular. Now personally, I don’t wear those because I either want to go casual and wear boat shoes or some sneakers or I wear leather dress shoes with a leather sole.

That being said, if you really dig the white rubber soles on a shoe, simply go for it, it’s something that you can wear, you can pull it off, it’s definitely more of a statement and I’ve even seen like red soles, yellow soles, or blue soles, so assume that people will judge you, they will make assumptions about you, and if you’re okay with that and you can wear it confidently, go for it. Of course, if you’re into classic men’s clothing and a traditionalist, this is not an option for you and in that case, stay with nicely polished leather shoes. So what about regular rubber soles? While they are acceptable and no one will ever call you out for it, personally, I much rather prefer leather soles. The sound they make, the way they roll on my foot, the way they feel, all of these are attributes I appreciate about the leather sole and I would not switch to a rubber sole.

So what do you do if it rains heavily you might wonder? Well, I have leather boots with rubber soles because they’re usually a little more casual and if it’s raining a lot, having a lace-up boot that is above my ankle always comes in handy to protect my feet from getting wet and cold. Apart from the shoes mentioned, you can also experiment with spectators in this segment which again are quite loud and traditionally, you have black and white ones which I think is not such a good combination because it is black, quite formal, white makes it informal. Instead, a brown and maybe off-white spectator or a navy with a gray spectator are really great. You could think about saddle shoes or just more unusual shoes. In general though, I always suggest you stay clear of square-toed shoes, rubber soles or any kind of metalwork or reflective letters such as silver or gold because they’re not really part of a gentleman’s wardrobe. So what are business casual shoes in a start-up environment? Frankly, the sky’s the limit and it can be anything from flip-flop over vans to very extraordinary Gucci loafers.

Most startups won’t even have a dress code and so it’s all about what you’re comfortable with and about their culture and how you fit in. Now, just because you can wear anything doesn’t mean everything has the same level of benefits for you. That being said, a nice pair of leather shoes or boots will always make you look more dapper and more grown-up than wearing some colorful sneakers or tennis shoes. In terms of colors or leather textures, really anything under the sun goes here. Even flip-flops or alpargatas are acceptable but frankly, I would simply not wear that but I guess I’m not telling you anything new here. Now that we covered three different environments, let’s talk about general guidelines that may help you to look stylish in your workplace. The general advice to your wardrobe and if you want the biggest bang for your buck and the lowest cost per wear, I strongly suggest to not invest in shoes that fuse modern style and traditional style.

Why you might wonder? Well, matching together formal and informal elements will mean it’s a very trendy shoe and it may be great at the moment but it’s just a fashion and a fad and it will disappear in just a few years of time. So even if you have the most highest quality leather shoe with a blue sole, chances are you will be tired of it in a year from now. Instead, buy classically styled shoes and try to find something that works with your style.

For example, you can go with medium brown penny loafers or you could go with cordovan tassel loafers. Alternatively, if you want even more casual, you can have suede green tassel loafers which are very casual yet still classically rooted. Because it’s business casual, broguing or hole perforations or decorations are always welcome and an element you should incorporate if you want to tone things down and make them easier to look at and less formal. Similarly to jeans, that should be avoided in a formal office environment unless expressly approved by management. You should also keep sneakers out of the office. Now that you know a lot about business casual shoes, there are times when you should avoid wearing them and step up your shoe game and just be a little more formal. For example, think of important meetings with a board maybe with their most important client or the CEO who is known to be a clothes horse. In those situations, you definitely want to take it up a notch and put your best foot forward. During work related events, conferences or symposia where you represent your company or maybe during a media interview, it really pays to have nice leather dress shoes in a darker color because they won’t stand out and people won’t just focus on your shoes but rather on what you say and the point you want to bring across.

Likewise, if you’re interviewing for a position, it always pays to put on the proper interview attire and to learn more about that as well as other interview preparation guides please check out this video series here. In summary, the dress-code business casual is not easy to master when it comes to shoes because it can mean different things at different times at different companies, however, using the three-tier approach of formal environment, less formal environment, and casual environment, it can really help you to nail it and put your best foot forward. Last but not least, if you’re unsure whether if something is appropriate or not, chances are it is inappropriate. Otherwise, you wouldn’t have thought about it in the first place and if even that doesn’t help, always keep in mind being slightly overdressed is always favorable to being slightly underdressed. That being said if you enjoyed this video please give us a thumbs up subscribe to our Channel so videos like this come right to your inbox and also make sure to check out our other videos about business casual dress code.

In today’s outfit i am wearing a mid-level business casual outfit that does not contain a tie or any form of neckwear it consists of a white blue check shirt with a button down color which is rather casual I am pairing it with a green sport coat and chinos likewise I’ll add a brown pair of penny loafers it’s medium brown it contrasts for the chinos yet my pocket square picks up the brown tones as well as the blue tones and tie everything together it’s from Fort Belvedere and you can find it in our shop here just like my blue and navy stripe shadow socks that are contrasting between the pants and shoes but since they’re dark and I pick up blue in the shirt and the pocket square it all works harmoniously together

7 Men’s Summer Shoe Mistakes & What Shoes To Wear

Welcome back to the Gentleman’s Gazette! Today we’ll discuss 7 summer shoes mistakes that most men make summer changes our wardrobes and it’s fun to go along with the seasons but when it comes to shoes, summer shoes are really just for summer and so they’re inherently different to the shoes that you can wear during spring, fall, and winter. Of course, people can wear absolutely anything today and trust me, they do. But as a gentleman, there’s certain classic style rules that help make you look well put together even during the peak heat of summer.

Mistake number one, wearing sandals or flip-flops for anything other than very specific outdoor occasions. Sorry, gentlemen, but if you’re serious about your outward appearance, wearing sandals or flip-flops on a regular basis is simply not in the cards unless you’re rafting or walking in a rocky riverbed. You should never wear sandals; the same is true for flip-flops, they’re really best at the pool or by the beach but otherwise, don’t show up with them at a restaurant. Ultimately, no one wants to see your hairy toes and calluses and that aside, I’ve never come across a really super high-quality pair of flip-flops or sandals that just had piles of craftsmanship in them.

The second mistake is wearing sporty trainers with your trousers and elegant summer outfits. It simply doesn’t go together. Trainers are fine if you ride your bike or go to and from the gym or workout in them but outside of that, there’s really no place for them in your general wardrobe. Nothing makes you look like an old grandpa than white trainers with white tennis socks so just skip them and put on proper summer shoes. The third mistake is not understanding the difference between driving mocs, loafers, and boat shoes. All three of those are great summer shoes because they are slip ons where you’re after tying if so it’s not just convenient but usually they also have deeper cutouts which is exposed your ankle more to the air which gives a nice flow that is cooler than wearing other regular lace-up shoes now what’s the difference between those three shoe types loafers are considered to be the most formal one out of the three you can wear the most slacks with seersucker x’ even a seersucker suit or even a railer suit except if it’s double-breasted then loafers are typically not appropriate but double-breasted is not advisable through hot summers anyways so you’re good here sometimes people even since we were in them barefoot however I don’t suggest that if you want to go for the barefoot look always go with no-show socks it’s much better for your feet and for the hygiene and it makes you more comfortable in your shoes all day next step down in firm melody are driving marks if you want to listen something a little more formal go with a penny loafer a little less casual go with it’s hassle over I like sweet for summer shoes because they’re casual and you can even go in more exotic colors so just maybe gray navy blue or dark green driving marks are a step down in terms of formality they’re usually worn inside the house or while driving but during the summer a lot of people were done just on the street very soft they’re comfortable but with the typical sole that is not solid rubber you probably wear them out prematurely if you wear them outside of the house or your car finally boat shoes are the least formal a classic staple would be a medium chestnut brown if you want to be a little brighter you can go with blues or salmon reds maybe green and blue combinations it’s a fun shoe if you adhere to the kind of waspey northeastern American style the first mistake is buying sewed formal shoes from the uppers such as Darby’s Oxford’s or wingtip brokes that are then combined with colorful trainer soles we get it summer is more casual and it also reflects in your shoe board that being said it’s wiser to play with the colors and letter materials but keeping the letter Sol then switching to a kind of rubber sole that is green or yellow or red yes it makes you stand out in a way but it’s more clownish than tasteful that being said rubber soles wear it much more quickly you can just replace them very easily and so it’s not a really good long-term investment instead buy a classic leather sole or a classic rubber sole and make a change of the uppers it’s a much better investment The fifth mistake is buying sneakers and using them to masquerade other shoes by that I mean people try to buy leather sneakers that are more expensive and nicer and so all of a sudden they think they can wear it for business casual or with a suit and it just looks odd and it’s not meant to be worn in that way the sixth mistake is to pack away all of your other shoes from your closet and simply use the specific summer shoes now yes you want specific summer shoes at the same time you can still get out your old brown loafers for example that you can wear in spring and maybe in the fall or you’re sweet desert boots those are all good shoes that you can utilize also during the summer so it pays to go through your shoe closet and yes you can set aside your black Oxford’s or the triple salt boots because that’s not something you wear during the summer but Brown Jones maybe reddish tones and sweat letters are great for summer combinations last but not least one of the biggest summer shoe mistakes is not owning a fun pair of distinct summer shoes they’re really lots of ways to have fun even with a classic men’s shoe wardrobe and that can include a white pair of buckskin shoes with colorful shoe laces for example and in general if you want to spice things up and you can’t quite afford to invest a lot in summer shoes just going with colorful shoe laces Really change the whole feel and the look of the shoes and you will immediately look summery with a very small investment for a large selection of round and flat high-quality waxed cotton shoelaces in over 15 different colors please check our shop here they’re all made from Fort Belvedere and they come in packages so the more you buy the less expensive they get alternatively if you’re looking for shoes look for a woven leather shoe or maybe something with a perforated leather because that will allow more air to get to your foot so you sweat less and you’re more comfortable if you like softer shoes maybe a pair of colorful boat shoes or driving locks or something to invest in apart from lighter desert boots that are unlined and actually very low I suggest you invest in a pair of green shoes because Green is really underrated especially for summer lately I’ve seen it much more come up in suits and sport coats and even shirts but for shoes it’s still not really popular and it’s particularly good in a darker shade such as for a screen or maybe olive green and with a suede texture apart from that classic spectators can work as well although the black and white spectators work I think brown and white are better suited for summer because it’s a less stark contrast and it just goes weather with the warmth outside if you want to learn more about different shoe types such as loafers or boat shoes Oxford’s Darby’s the differences please check out our in-depth guides on the website and if you are interested in summer suits or to eight hallmarks of a great summer jacket please subscribe to our Channel and stuff like this comes right here in box also use a search function because we have a lot of things about summer and hot weather in today’s Africa combination with an off-white jacket that has Center box pleats which makes it easy to move around it’s made out of a thicker coarser Panama weave fabric it’s from Ralph Lauren purple label and I’m combining it with a light blue open weave summery shirt and a mattr silk tie in dark bottle green with blue or yellow accents Fort Belvedere it matches the green belt as well as my green shoes which are made out of suede leather and are a wingtip Oxford from Scott Oh so to make it a little more summer without being too bright I edit dark purple shoelaces that contrast shoes work with a summery theme but they’re not super loud measures a barrel cuffs because cufflinks would be simply too hot and so I’m wearing a little pinky ring with malachite which picks up the green color just like the pocket square which ties together the green tones of a tie and a shoe as well as the light blue of the shirt Nasir Sakura trousers because the shoes are colorful and seersucker is bright I opted for a dark pair of over the calf Khan socks in navy with clocks because contrasts a shoe as well as the pants and creates a nice combination to learn more about how to combine shoes pants and socks police check out this free PDF guide and if you’re interested in all the four bail deer accessories showcase in this video you can find them in our shop here

Should You Wear Denim Jeans With A Suit Jacket Or Blazer?

Welcome back to the Gentleman’s Gazette! Have you ever asked yourselves, should I wear a jacket with jeans? Is it too formal, is it just right? Well in today’s video we’ll talk about nothing but jeans, blazers and suit jackets. When you can wear them, when you should avoid them and anything else you want to know about those combinations. Obviously it’s a very similar question to can I wear a jacket without a tie and we discussed it in a separate video here.

When should you wear a jacket with denim is a popular question because many men today wear it, yet it goes against traditional style rules because jeans used to be strictly blue-collar workwear. Today, men’s style is a lot more casual than it used to be 50 or 60 years ago and jeans are probably the number one worn pants by men. As everything gets more casual of course a lot of men try to wear jeans with anything else they have in their wardrobe particularly suit separates because that’s what they sometimes have to wear to work.

In an attempt to dress up their jeans or to dress down their suit they simply combine the two but it rarely works and it hardly ever looks advantageous unless you follow a few clear-cut rules. The issue of suit jackets with jeans is that it is a clash of formalities. Typically it’s a combination seen worn by middle managers who want to seem approachable yet be a cut above their subordinates.

It’s definitely a fine line to walk but dressing purposefully and thoughtfully is the key here. Personally I hardly ever wear jeans with a jacket, it’s simply not my style. But here is how you can pull it off. First of all pair your blazer or sport coat only with your dressiest jeans. That means no holes and no used look. Also it’s really important that you have enough contrast between your sport coat and your jeans. If you have a dark washed denim with a dark navy blazer it’s not enough contrast and it looks odd because it’s similar yet it’s not a suit and it’s just weird. So in general, a medium dark wash or something slightly lighter is best. It’s essential that your jeans don’t puddle and are hemmed to the exactly right length. To learn more about what length is right for you, check out this video here.

In terms of cut, a straight leg or maybe something that slightly tapered works best. Definitely avoid really baggy cuts as well as a bootcut. Also don’t cuff or pin roll your jeans because that’s simply too casual. If you still want to learn how to do it please check out this video here. Two, rather than going with a navy blazer instead branch out and maybe go with jackets that have different colors as well as patterns and materials because that’s more contrasting or interesting, but also more casual and it works better with jeans.

Good features include notch lapels because peak lapels would be too formal. You can also have patch pockets because they’re more formal than jetted pockets or flat pockets. In terms of patterns, you can go with little houndstooth pattern maybe a small micro check or a classic Prince of Wales check. When it comes to material compositions, 100% wool is okay but to make it more casual add cotton and linen blends sometimes wool linen or wool cotton blends or sometimes also a little bit of silk or cashmere for a softer hand and touch. In terms of jacket colors, you can go with lighter shades of blue, maybe a royal blue for example or even a lighter blue. Overchecks could be in red or an orange because that’s a little more casual. In the winter brown tones are great especially as a Glen check with dark brown and off-white or maybe a herringbone jacket in a medium brown. With all those lighter colors, one pair of dark washed denim really works best because it provides a contrast and it’s a classic jeans color.

The personal favorite of mine is the color green it goes really well with dark washed denim. And to learn more about why green is underrated in menswear, please check out this video here. Also definitely avoid white or off-white jackets because the denim will color off on it and the contrast is too strong. Three, make sure to wear your denim and your sport coat with casual shirts to bridge the gap formalities. Long-sleeve dress shirts are good but ideally you should avoid the most formal variations in solid white because they’re just too businesslike.

Instead maybe you go with an off-white or a green shirt maybe something with a rougher texture and maybe skip ironing to create a more casual look. Alternatively you can also go with button-down collars because they are more casual and check shirts, as well as little houndstooth shirts because they’re also more casual than solids. If you want something like a solid I suggest an Oxford fabric with a two-tone maybe light blue and white because it’s durable and more casual. No matter what shirt you choose always tuck it in because an untucked shirt with a sport coat or a suit jacket simply looks odd. Four, wear the combination of jeans and sport coat with the right kind of shoes. Black Oxfords are way too formal and not appropriate here. At the same time boat shoes are too informal and should likewise be avoided. So what should you wear? Ideally go with brown tones or burgundy and oxblood. If you want to be a little more experimental you can think about olive green, grey or maybe navy. In terms of styles a classic derby shoe is good just like those burgundy derbies or these olive green derbies on a very Parisian elegant last.

Because of the color it makes them work with a jeans and a sport coat. Alternatively you could opt for loafers either tassel loafers or penny loafers, both work. Another good options are monk straps such as those brown single monks with some broguing and a wingtip or those more fashion-forward double monks in burgundy. If you want to go with oxfords go with brogues either half brogues or full brogues because that’s casual enough to wear with jeans and it ties the ensemble together with your sport coat. Other good options include chukka boots or chelsea boots. In terms of leather texture, suede is really great to combine with jeans and a sport coat. Why? Simply because it’s a little more casual. It’s less serious and as such it ties together those two elements of different formalities So now that you know how and when to wear a blazer with jeans, the question is, when should you not wear those two items together? First of all the biggest mistake I see men make in this situation is that they pair a traditional business suit with a pair of jeans they have.

Particularly it’s that black business suit jacket or that pinstripe jacket that they wear with dark blue jeans and it just looks weird and odd. As discussed before, while some suit jackets can be worn with jeans especially if they’re more casual any kind of business suit should not be combined with jeans, that includes solid navy jackets or maybe solid grey jackets but also any kind of stripe, pinstripe, rope stripe or chalk stripe. They won’t look good with jeans. Don’t combine jeans with a double-breasted business jacket. Double-breasted is typically more formal. It has peak lapels and as such is even more formal than a single breasted blazer with patch pockets. Hence, avoid. However in recent years double-breasted jackets have become a lot more popular especially at Pitti Uomo. And if you have something that has a nice linen blend maybe with the Prince of Wales pattern and lighter colors, you can definitely combine them with jeans. Never wear a t-shirt with jeans underneath a jacket because it’s a clash of formalities. Either you wear just a t-shirt and some jeans and you skip the jacket all together or you opt for the jacket but you go with a casual dress shirt or this blend of polo shirt and dress shirt I mentioned before.

Four, never wear any kind of black shoes especially not black dress shoes with this combination because it looks out of place. Black is fine for formal business suits and office wear but not when you were jeans. Instead go with browns, tan tones, burgundy tones, greens or anything else but not black. To learn why black is one of the most overrated colors in menswear, please check out this video here.

Five, jeans with a jacket are not ideal if you want to wear a tie, a bow tie or maybe an ascot simply because it would be too formal and a clash. So if you opt for the combination of jacket and jeans forgo your tie and your neck wear instead go with a pocket square or maybe a boutonniere because that creates a visual interest and it just creates for a more polished look. For a selection of pocket squares that are perfect to be worn with jeans and a sport coat please check out our store here. You’ll also find boutonnieres there that will just round out your outfit. Six, you don’t want to wear jeans with a jacket if you want to have a formal dress shirt. That means, double cuffs with cufflinks because that’s too formal for regular cotton denim. Likewise, a solid white shirt is not appropriate.

A light blue might work. Maybe go with a different texture, a different weave that is more open so it breathes better and you’re more comfortable during the summer. Striped shirts can work especially if you have bolder stripes, wider or larger scale stripes or maybe stripes in a different color. At the same time the whole ensemble has to work together. And we’ll cover the specific skill of combining patterns especially stripes in a different video. Don’t wear jeans and a sport coat if you don’t know the dress code or if you’re unsure about the formality at the event or the occasion you will wear it to. Why you might wonder? Well, if you’re not sure about a dress code it always pays to dress one notch up.

In that case it would mean wearing your blazer with a pair of chinos rather than your jeans. Alternatively if you think that’s over-the-top you can skip the jacket and just go with a casual dress shirt and a pair of slacks either chinos or jeans depending on what you think is right for the occasion. By the way during the colder months of the year, a tweed jacket works really well with jeans simply because it’s more casual by definition.

It has a coarser weave. It has more warmer earth tones and so it’s a great jacket that is usually single breasted and has notch lapels which makes it again less formal and therefore perfectly suited for jeans. That being said there are tons of other jackets which are less formal and therefore equally as well suited to jeans as a tweed jacket. Some of them include a Panama jacket which is more of a summery jacket. Another one, the Harrington jacket and you can check out more in our Harrington jacket guide here. So in conclusion, you can definitely wear a jacket with jeans just make sure it’s casual enough and not your typical business suit.

When it comes to foot wear, brown shoes are your friend and make sure it’s not too casual but also not too formal. In today’s video I’m wearing a combination of dark wash denim jeans and a suit jacket which is part of a Prince of Wales suit with a slight brown over check. Obviously there’s a lot of contrast between the jacket and so it works. I combined it with a cream or off-white dress shirt. It has button cuffs, no French cuffs.

And I also decided to leave them undone because it’s a little warmer outside and it simply adds a more casual flare to your overall ensemble. Of course I skipped the necktie and instead I went with a very casual pocket square which is made out of a handcrafted linen with hand rolled edges and X stitches. You can find a rich selection of those pocket squares in this color or others in our shop here. For my shoes I opted for a reddish chestnut brown monk strap with silver buckles and a wingtip full brogue and I combined it with a belt in the same kind of color tone which is alligator and also has a silver buckle so everything is harmonious and works. For my socks I opted for a pair of Fort Belvedere socks in navy blue and yellow because they provide a bit of contrast to the shoe as well as the jeans yet they tie everything well together.

To learn more about how you can combine shoes with socks and pants, please check out this video here. If you enjoyed this video give us a like and subscribe to this channel so videos like this come right to your inbox. .

Wool SUPER Numbers Explained – What Do Suit Fabric Super 100s, 180s… Mean?

Welcome back to the Gentleman’s Gazette! In today’s video, we’ll be discussing what the term “super” means in relation to worsted wool suits and how it does and doesn’t determine suit quality. Generally speaking, worsted wool is the most popular fabric for men’s suits around the world and while there are technically many fabrics that fall into the definition of worsted, there are subtle differences in classification among them. One of these determining factors is the wool’s so-called super number. You may be familiar with seeing terms like super 120s or super 180s on online retail pages or in fabric swatch books but what exactly does the term super mean in relation to worsted wool? Before we can answer that question, let’s talk a bit more generally about what qualifies as worsted wool.

The term worsted can alternately describe either a combed yarn, a fabric made from a combed yarn, or a weight of yarn. A combed yarn, by the way, is made when wool fibers are rotated by metal combs that align the long fibers while discarding these short staple fibers. The result is a long lasting fine and smooth yarn with a somewhat glossy finish. Also, by adjusting the pull of these combs on the wool, one can get lighter or heavier yarns whereas varying the twists will impact the look, feel, and strength of the yarn. Tight twisting provides a crisper feel whereas loose twisting makes for a softer but weaker yarn. One quick note here to answer the question of why it’s called worsted wool in the first place. The names origin dates all the way back to the 12th century when the English city of worsted in Norfolk along with a few other cities in the area became a manufacturing center of cloth and cloth weaving and to answer another general question, is a lighter worsted wool better than a heavier weight? The answer not necessarily no.

Let’s take an overcoat as an example of this principle; while a softer fabric would feel more pleasant on one’s skin, a heavier coat made of something like Donegal tweed is going to be much more sturdy and keep you more warm than a lighter and softer cashmere coat would. Of course, you’re not often going to be wearing an overcoat against your bare skin but this illustrates the principle that the heavier weight is going to be sturdier than the lighter weight even if the lighter weight is softer.

Similarly, you might be under the impression that a lighter weight weave is going to be cooler to wear and a heavier weight would be warmer but this isn’t always the case either. Something that’s heavy but relatively open in its weave like a fresco fabric, for instance, is going to feel much cooler when worn than something that’s tightly woven and lighter like a super 150s fabric, for instance. Of course, the interlining and canvas of a jacket are going to have an impact on how hot it feels while you’re wearing it but that’s a subject for another video. With all that said though, fabrics that are commonly available today are just going to be lighter in general than fabrics that were produced 30 or 40 years ago or even more.

This will be readily apparent to you if you visit a thrift store and pick out an old suit. It’s probably just going to be heavier than something you’d buy today. Speaking of tweed overcoats though, you can take a look at our video and related article on the fascinating history of the tweed fabric here. It’s important to keep in mind then that a lighter fabric with a higher super number is not a hallmark of a better fabric, it just indicates that the fibers used were thinner in diameter. Similarly, the super number doesn’t provide any information about the weave or how heavy the fabric is. One more thing to touch on before we get into the particulars of what supers measure though and that’s how they came to be in the first place. You might be surprised to learn that the wool that goes into a great many suits that are produced around the world today comes from sheep that are descended from just two rams and four ewes. In 1789, King Charles the fourth of Spain gifted six sheep to the Dutch East India Company; these sheep were then shipped to South Africa.

In 1795, a British immigrant to Australia named John McArthur bought 26 of the offspring of these original six sheep and transported them back to botany bay. These 26 sheep were then bred to form the backbone of what’s now the Australian wool industry that has sheep that now number more than one hundred and twenty million. The wool from these sheep produced in grades between 60s and 80s around this time, essentially measuring how fine the yarns were, was top of the line. As such, most of it went directly to tailors on Savile Row. 100s grade wool meanwhile was thought to be unattainable at this time in history. Until the wool mill of Joseph Lumbs and Sons in Huddersfield West Yorkshire England was finally able to produce some of it.

Lumb bought enough of this wool for an entire year’s supply and brought it to market under the term Lumb’s Huddersfield super 100s thus super terminology for worsted wool suits was born. At this time in the late 18th century, British wool merchants would often refer to their wares by largely subjective terminology in describing how fine the wool was; terms like low, medium, fine, the newly created super, and so on. But because producers and consumers eventually wanted terminology that was more objective in how the wool was rated, the city of Bradford, England led the way in grading wool more objectively. This process became known as the English worsted yarn count system or more generally, the Bradford system. Fast forward now to 1968 when the USDA created the United States standards for grade wool, this assigned ranges of average fiber diameter or AFD and maximum standard deviation to the previously set up Bradford count. So with these standardization systems in place, super still sits as the top designation for how fine a wool may be.

With that said, some companies have gotten a little subjective again in exactly how they’re grading their super wools. So for example, a super 200s wool from one manufacturer might be a bit different in how fine it is from a super 200s wool from another manufacturer. Things are generally going to be fairly consistent, overall. When we’re discussing reputable manufacturers of high quality, most of them are going to abide by the guidelines set out in the fabric labeling code of practice from the International Wool Textile Organization or IWTO. So to recap then, what the super number is actually measuring is how fine the wool is because what’s being measured is how many times each of the individual woollen yarns have been twisted around.

Generally then, the higher the super number is, the finer the cloth in question will be. Often, this means it will also be lighter but as we said earlier, this isn’t always the case. How fine these woolen yarns are is typically measured in micrometers also called microns. We’ve got a detailed chart for how each super number corresponds to a micron measurement in the corresponding article on our website you can find that here.

So a higher super number will mean that a fabric is going to be softer to the touch and generally will feel more like luxurious. Conversely, a lower super number will mean that the cloth is more sturdy and probably warmer. As we’ve said, it will generally be heavier but not always. While it’s commonly believed that the super number of a given fabric also has something to do with its individual thread count, this simply isn’t true and there’s not a correlation between the two measurements. While a higher super number does to some extent denote the exclusivity of a given fabric, because something like a super 200s would contain some of the rarest wool fibers available, this is only an indication of that exclusivity and rarity, not necessarily subjective quality. Here’s another important note, the full word “super” can only be applied to fabrics made of pure new wool. Also, fabrics made with wool blended with other things like cashmere, alpaca, silk, or so on can use the slightly related S designation, though not the full word super.

Now you may be wondering, how do these super numbers translate into considerations for wearing? Stated simply, anything with a higher super number is going to be more temperamental and hard to care for over time. The thinner, finer fibers of a wool with a high super number may have an amazing hand which is to say how soft they feel to the touch but they’re also going to break down much more quickly than a heftier fiber would.

As an example here, something like a super 180s wool would probably feel softer on the body whereas something like a super 100s wool is going to be more durable, less prone to wrinkling, and probably better suited for repeated everyday wear. On that note, snags in finer fabrics happen much more frequently and are also far more difficult to repair than a snag in a comparatively coarse fabric. Speaking generally then, it’s our opinion that it’s best not to get overly caught up in the super numbers of your worsted wool suits. Very good quality suits can be created from wool in the super 100s to super 150s range and even below that, and of course, a suit that is well fitted to the wearer’s body is going to look great regardless of what the super number might be or even if it doesn’t have one. Conversely, something in a super 180s or super 220s wool is still going to look sloppy if it doesn’t fit your frame well.

On that note you can take a look at two videos on how a suit should properly fit here. Finally today, we’ve got a few general guidelines for you if you really do want to pay close attention to the super numbers of your suits and how you could wear them effectively. For standard everyday wear, you could go with something with a pretty low super number. Something that’s below 100 up to a super 100s or super 120s, for example. For an important business meeting, a conference, or something that’s a bit more important than the average day-to-day at the office, you could go with something like a super 130s or super 150s and for special events, you could go with something like a super 180s or anything above that.

Again, these are just hypothetical suggestions. If you really do want to pay attention to your super number, of course, you could wear a suit made from a different material entirely than worsted wool and still look good or you could wear a worsted suit that doesn’t even have a registered super number. You just have to make sure that the suit is fitting you well and flattering your form. In conclusion then, while the super number of a worsted wool can be handy in determining how fine and soft the yarns of a given wool are, it shouldn’t be used as the only measure of quality in wool suiting. Remember to focus first on fit then determine if you really like the look of the suit and how often you think you will wear it.

From this point, you can consider the super number. So which part of today’s explanation did you find most intriguing? And if you are one of those men that pays attention to the super number of your suits, do you have a favorite number? Ahare with us in the comment section below and as always don’t forget to subscribe to the channel and hit the little bell icon so these videos will come straight to your inbox in today’s video I am wearing a wool suit but to illustrate the concept that super numbers aren’t everything this wool suit doesn’t even have a super grade still I like the look of it and I think it fits my frame well so it’s one that I wear relatively often the suit is charcoal in color and it has a slight bit of texture to its weave technically it’s actually a three-piece suit but I more often wear it as a two-piece because I find that it fits me better that way still I wouldn’t be surprised if you see the three-piece configuration on the channel eventually I’ve paired the suit today with a pastel pink shirt from Charles Tyrwhitt as pink and charcoal are a classic combination you can take a look at our article on wearing pink in menswear here the shirt has French cuffs and I’m wearing in them today the platinum plated sterling silver eagleclaw cufflinks from Fort Belvedere with carnelian as the stone the red tones of the carnelian harmonized well with the pink of the shirt also from Fort Belvedere today is my tie which is a Prince of Wales Glen check tie in silk featuring the colors of Burgundy black and white the burgundy is a little bit faint but when viewed in conjunction with the pink shirt you can see that they harmonize well similarly the black and white complement the charcoal in my suit my pocket square is white Irish linen from Fort Belvedere and my boutonniere is the mini pink carnation all of these accessories are available in the Fort Belvedere shop and you can find them by going here given that I’m wearing a suit today the trousers and the jacket match exactly so I’ve gone for something simple and also worn charcoal socks that are fairly close in color to the trousers and the outfit is rounded out today by my black cap toe derbys.

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How To Iron Shirts Like A Pro – Easy Step-by-Step Dress Shirt Ironing Guide – Gentleman’s Gazette

Welcome back to the Gentleman’s Gazette and part 2 of our ironing series. Today, I’ll show you how to iron a shirt or a dress shirt for men and women and I’ll share all the tricks with you that I use to get the perfect result. If you have not checked out part of one of our ironing series yet, please check it out here where we discuss all the things you need to iron properly. The dress shirt is the easiest thing to iron in a classic man’s wardrobe and it’s the easiest one to begin with when you’re just getting into ironing. It may surprise you but it all starts in the laundry room, a proper prep work is essential to get it right. The higher the spin cycle on your machine, the more wrinkles you will get.

So keep that in mind when you launder your shirts in the first place. When you take them out of the machine, they’re still wet and ideally, this is a good time to smooth out the wrinkles. Now, in theory, you’re ready to iron. For the most efficient way, always iron a number of shirts at the same time because a lot of effort goes into prep work and you can save time on a per shirt basis, the more shirts you iron. Now should or should you not use a dryer? The big advantage of the dryer is that it helps to release wrinkles and makes ironing easier, on the other hand, the huge disadvantage is that 99.99% of shirts have a glued interlining; either in the collar, or the cuffs, or in the placket, a dryer is very hard on those interlinings and chances for it to blister and come undone are much higher the more often you dry it. Because of that, personally, I never put shirts my dryer and I’ll urge you to never put your high end shirts in a dryer either because it will ruin your investment.

So should you iron your shirts when they’re still wet? The answer is yes and no. Yes because if they’re damp and not soaking wet, it’s easier to iron them at the same time, it will take more time because the cold water has to be heated up and evaporated by your iron. Personally, I’ll try to find a good middle ground so it’s not too wet but also not dry.

If you happen to have a dry shirt, I suggest you spray it with a spray bottle of water then put it in a plastic bag for about 10 to 15 minutes, let it sit there that way, it can moisten up and ironing will be much easier on you. Shirts that are hard to iron are prone to wrinkling and waves which are unsightly and I’ll show you how to get rid of them. First of all, lay out all your equipment. At the minimum, you need the ironing board. If you are right-handed, the ironing board tip should face to the left. Now, check the label of your shirt and turn the iron to the proper temperature. Usually, they have settings based on a material such as linen, cotton, polyester, or nylon blends. Cotton requires a relatively high temperature but if you have a polyblend shirt, make sure you lower the setting, otherwise, it will ruin your shirt. Two, make sure everything is clean. Look at the shirts to see if there any recent stains because if you iron them now , the heat will set in the stain and it will be much harder to remove it then if you take action right away.

Also make sure the ironing board cover is clean and there are no stains on the bottom of the ironing sole. What I’ve seen sometimes is there’s plastic from plastic buttons or some dirt and if you iron with a hot iron on the shirt, you will set a stain in it for good. Three, add water. You definitely want a steam iron and that requires water. I suggest you go with distilled water because it is not hard water but soft water being it has few minerals such as calcium and magnesium and that can cause your iron to clog up and you’ll get a grayish whitish substance onto your shirts that will also cause stains. If you live in an area where the water is soft and you can tell by looking for example in your showerhead and if there’s no residue, you can also use it right in your iron.

Also make sure there’s water in your spray bottle because the mist it produces is much finer and much better suited to ironing than the spray head that’s usually built into an iron. Once your iron has reached the proper temperature, it’s time to go. Keep in mind, it’s much easier to iron, you get much better results if you use a professional-grade vacuum table and to learn more about that, please check out part 1 of this series. Five, start with pressing the cuffs and the sleeves. No matter if it’s a barrel cuff or a French cuff, I start ironing on the inside of the cuff. Once that’s done, I look at the outside and if there’s still some wrinkles, I iron again. Always make sure to iron from the outside of the cuff in, otherwise, you’ll get little wrinkles by the stitching especially on shirts with a sewn interlining. It can be quite frustrating but practice pays off.

Once I’m done with the cuff, it’s time to iron the sleeve. If you just have a regular ironing board, I suggest to lay down the sleeve flat because at this stage, you are ironing two layers at the same time. If you don’t do it right, you get wrinkles and it will take you much long. It truly pays to have a system here. I always start in a corner of the armpit and I iron at middle parts and not the top edge because that will leave a crease. I also always start in the backside and once I’m done, I flip it over to the front side and repeat the motion.

Try to iron in the middle part and when you’re done, you can add a crease on top. If you like a strong crease, you can now add the clapper which is a piece of wood that really helps to get a strong crease in it. Personally, I’m not a big fan of the crease and because of that, I use a sleeve board. The big advantage of the sleeve board is that the results are much nicer, you’ll have fewer wrinkles, and you have no crease all the way around. I start by pulling the sleeve of the sleeve board so the seam is on top. Now, I work my way around until I get to the seam again and I’ve ironed everything.

Most dress shirts have one or more pleats sewn onto the cuff to create volume for your sleeve and the sleeve board really helps you to get nice creases in the exact length that you want. The key to success in ironing is not to use broad motions all over the place but short controlled movements that have enough pressure. As you may know, ironing is also known as pressing and that’s because you have to press down.

You can see me going back and forth with my iron because I have two pointed ends. If you have just one pointed end, you have to always go in a direction with a point, otherwise, you’ll end up with wrinkles in the shirt. Once you’re done with one sleeve, move on to the next cuff and sleeve. It doesn’t matter which one you start with. Six, press the collar and the yoke. First of all, you flip up your color and you remove any collar stays if that’s possible, if they’re sewn in, just leave them in there. Now I iron from one side to the middle, stop, and I go to the other side and iron again to the middle.

Avoid ironing from the inside out or in one motion because it will create wrinkles. Because the collar has so many layers, you may have to go over it once more simply to get the right result. Once you’re done with the underside of the collar, flip it open so you’re now ironing the outside of the collar. Again, outside to the middle from one side and outside to the middle from the other side. If you have a collar with a sewn interlining, it can be a little more tricky. Try to pull the fabric so it stays flat especially along the stitched seams. Again, use short strokes and not bold long motions. Now some people like to fold the collar back down and iron on top of it so it gets its natural shape. If you want a soft roll collar, especially on top or if you have removable collar stays, I suggest you skip that step.

Once your collar is done, it’s time for the yoke. Most ironing boards have a perfect shape to iron one side of the yoke at a time. Make sure the yoke lays flat and then with short motions, iron it nice and flat. Move on to the middle, iron the middle of the yoke and then go on and move on to the other side of the yoke. The technique is the same. While you do that though, make sure you don’t iron deep wrinkles into the back of your shirt. If you do it’s not the end of the world because we iron that at a later stage.

The order in which I iron is well thought through so don’t skip it up, otherwise, you end up with a more wrinkly shirt. Once around with a collar and a yoke, it’s time to finish the body. First face the buttons on the board and iron it from the back. That way I can go all the way one nice clean motion make sure there’s no wrinkles. Now flip the shirt so the buttons face up. If you have a solid shirt, you can quickly go into the areas in between the buttons. If you have a striped shirt I suggest to simply tap down your iron lift it up move to the next section tap down again and so forth. I do this because otherwise your lines will become wavy and it’ll show on the front of the shirt.

Most ironing boards are shaped slimmer at the end and so you can lay the shirt down and pull it flat. Once I’ve done that, I start in the direction of the pattern. If it’s a stripe, in a striped pattern, from the bottom to the top. Since the front of your shirt is the most visible part, you’ll make sure it looks extra clean and neat. Make sure the area around the armhole is neat as well as the area on top next to the collar. If you happen to iron a crease, flatten it out, spray some water on top of it, either with the iron or with your spray bottle and go over it again. In case your shirt has a pocket, that can be tricky to iron. make sure you pull it flat iron it separately in short strokes.

If there’s excess fabric, you can avoid creases by ironing along them, never across them. The pointed tip of your iron comes in very handy here, just like in every area where there’s a little corner. Because most irons don’t have steam holes right in the tip of the iron, it pays to separately steam them or use some water and spray it on. At the end of the day, you want a nice smooth result especially along the seams.

Once the button front of the shirt is done, I move on to the back. It’s the same procedure again. I start on one side and pull it flat so I can then start to iron. If the shirt has pleats in the back align the pleat and iron over it so it looks neat exactly that what you want. If you have a hand made shirt especially an Italian one, chances are, it has grinze along the seam of the yoke in the back. To get them to look right, use the iron in short strokes pointing towards the yoke seam and you want that wavy effect that’s part of the craftsmanship and the handwork and it’s not a defect or something that you can eliminate by ironing. When you’re done with one side of the back slightly rotate it over the board and keep ironing the middle and then the other side.

At this time I also check the yoke on top and see if there are any wrinkles I can go over it again and voila now you’re done! Simply pull the shirt off the board, put it in the hanger, and button the top button or sometimes the top two buttons if you have a big collar. Now you can just hang in your closet and your shirt is ready to go next time you need it. As I mentioned before, because of all the time it needs to set up it really pays to iron all your shirts at once. If you enjoyed this guide give us a thumbs up hit a little bell so videos like this come right to your inbox and stay tuned for part three we talk about ironing dress pants you want to see how I earn a dress shirt from start to finish step-by-step from different angles with all the intricate details without being rushed please watch this video here in today’s video wearing a more relaxed outfit which is ideal for ironing consists of a pressed dress shirt which is striped in blue and white cotton I’m using barrel cuffs and the French cuffs because that way that won’t interfere with the ironing wearing a pair of navy blue denim with a brown crocodile belt and a silver buckle which works well with my silver and carnelian green the shoes are antique brown penny loafers and they work well with a belt my socks consist of red and blue their shadow stripes socks from Fort Belvedere which can find in our shop here they tie together the shoes the jeans as well as the ring I’m wearing

Hermes Ties – Is It Worth It? Or Is A $180 Hermès Tie Too Expensive?

Welcome back to the Gentleman’s Gazette! In today’s video, we discuss whether Hermès ties are worth it. We talk about the famous printed ties with animal prints, horse prints, the woven ones as well as scarf ties, the pros and cons, and whether they’re worth your $180 or not. In a world of iconic menswear, men’s ties are certainly up there with the Burberry trench coat which by the way, you want to know if a Burberry trench coat is worth it or not ,please check out this video here. Generally, you know you’re doing something right even an entire industry is here to fake your products and that’s the case with Hermès ties.

Finding a used one is almost like a gamble if you don’t know what to look for and stay tuned for another video where we discuss how you can identify a fake Hermès tie from a genuine one. For this video, we’ll assume you buy one directly from Hermès so you know what you get is the real deal. In the US, Hermès ties have a price tag of a $180. In Europe, it’s a little less. In Australia, it’s a little more but overall, it’s right around that price point. By the way, the brand is called Hermès , not HERMIS and to learn more about how to pronounce luxury brands please check out this video here. In order to be able to determine if an Hermes tie is worth it or not, we briefly have to take a look at the history of the house. Hermès is a brand who was founded in 1837 by the German born Thierry Hermès . Initially, it was a manufacturer of harnesses and Brittles for the carriage trade. By 1855, they won their first prize for their quality merchandise and soon thereafter, they would start to expand their products and include things like saddle and leather goods.

Now I could fill hours with the intricate history of Hermes but in terms of ties and silk, the home of the Hermès silk since 1937 has been the city of Lyon. The first silk design Hermes created was actually not for a tie but for a scarf. They are probably even more famous for women than the ties are for men. They’re typically in 70 centimeters by 70 centimeters. The very first pattern showed some women playing a game; the pattern was called Dames Blanches. In 1978, the fifth generation of family owners came in and Jean-Louis Dumas became the chairman of Hermès as well as the creative director. Under his reign, Hermès switched to focus on silk products, leather goods, and ready-to-wear goods. Over the years, Hermès has produced thousands of designs and they’ve become iconic, very recognized and worn by Wall Street bankers, London businessmen, Russian oligarchs, or emerging Chinese upper-class men.

So with that being said, is an Hermes tie worth $180? Well, first we have to determine what you get for that money. The tie production, especially for the printed ties, is vertically integrated. Hermès has their own silkworm plantations in southern Brazil and there they control the spinning of the yarn, the weaving of the yarn, the designs of the silk, the printing, as well as the sales, all the way to the customer.

All designs are exclusively designed for Hermes and you can’t find them elsewhere unless they’re knockoffs of course. Every season, 10 new ones are added as well as old ones are reissued and overall, they’ve probably created more than 75,000 different color schemes. So between the designs and the colors, there’s really a rich archive. Hermès is known for their printed ties especially for their often whimsical animal print ties, horse-inspired prints, as well as geometrical prints, and small micropatterns. All their ties are silk screen printed which is an old way to do it. Back in the day, it was actually done with hand blocks, today, that is not done anymore. Today, they use screens which are a lot more labor-intensive and therefore more costly than digital printing. So why does Hermès still use silk screen printing? They believe it produces richer colors in a more high-quality product and I couldn’t agree with them more which is why we, at Fort Belvedere, make all of our silks in a screen print and not digital print.

All famous Hermes ties are printed on a rather lightweight silk twill that has a little bit of gum added back to it so it has a really soft touch that is not dry at all. When you touch an Hermès tie, it has a very typical feel, it’s not super gummy like old madder silk ties, but it’s also not like a jacquard woven tie. It’s something in between that is special for Hermes and that they want to keep secret which is one of the reasons that’s vertically integrated. A true connoisseur will likely always be able to determine whether it’s a fake or not based on the way the silk feels in their hand. It’s hard to describe but it’s something you have to develop over time. Again, stay tuned for a guide on how you can identify a fake Hermes tie from a real one.

Every Hermès tie is made out of two panels of silk, not three, like most ties but also not like one like very expensive ties. The only difference is basically that you need more silk, the fewer pieces you use for each individual tie. Making a tie out of two pieces is totally fine and has no impact on the quality. The next step the fabric is cut. Hermès ties often feature specific model numbers with the logo printed in the silk and because of that, they have to be cut very accurately otherwise, the finished product won’t have lines that are very neat.

That’s another way to make it difficult for fakers because often times, they get these little details wrong but Hermes always gets them right. Once a tie is cut, you add two layers of interlining that gives the tie the feel and the springiness. Hermès ties are three fold ties and they’re hand sewn with a thread that is a hundred and seventy centimeters long, that’s about five foot and seven inches. All Hermes ties contain a little loop at the bottom and because that loop stitch ties are flexible. Many quality ties are sewn in that way so I’m not surprised to see that from an Hermes tie.

Overall, if there’s one thing about Hermès ties, I would say that they pay very great attention to detail and they focus on quality. It’s even little things such as the label which sits eight inches from the bottom and is sewn on in four spots or the model number in this little box which is neatly aligned with the edge and not crooked. Also that keeper tag is woven and not printed and has very specific elements that are different with the different ties. So a woven tie will have a different label than a printed animal tie which is different again to a heavy printed twill silk. The same is true for the backside tip lining of the tie; with printed ties, it’s a solid color versus with woven ties, it’s a kind of golden H symbol that you see and again, every tie is slightly different and only Hermes knows what they do for each specific tie. Fakers on the other hand don’t and so they often get it mixed up.

So objectively, when you get an Hermès tie, you get a high quality product. What you don’t get is a sevenfold, eightfold, nine-fold, or tenfold tie. You also don’t get a tie that comes in very many widths. By default, most Hermès ties are eight centimeters wide, they have some that are seven centimeters, and some ties that are less and in this day and age, it’s hard to find a nine centimeter Hermes tie. Also in terms of length, Hermès ties are rather limited. Their general tie is about 60 inches long or 152 centimeters, I say about because a tie is always cut on the bias which makes it very flexible but when you lay it down it’s a little stretchy and so you never get the exact measurement from each tie to another.

Online, in the store, they have a very small section of ties that are longer but they do not have ties for shorter men which is a shame because if you’re a shorter man, you need a tie that it’s shorter otherwise you end up with a large tie knot that simply doesn’t flatter your silhouette. Because of that at Fort Belvedere, we created ties in short regular and long and not just for certain models but for all the models. You’re also somewhat limited in terms of variety with Hermes ties. Yes, they have many patterns, many prints, they come in quite a few colors, at the same time, they always print it on the same silk twill. If you look at Hermès’ woven ties, they’re usually small jacquard patterns, some geometrical patterns, the occasional stripe, but you don’t find elaborate stripes there, you don’t find rep ties, you don’t find grenadine ties, or mohair ties, wool ties, they sometimes have cashmere ties, but again, it’s very limited. On the other hand, if you want to experiment more with your tie silks and maybe have a shantung Hermès or a grenadine wool silk mohair blend, Hermès is not the brand for you.

So are Hermes ties worth it? Of course the answer is it depends! If you’re someone who really likes printed whimsical motifs, these little animal prints then Hermès is definitely the way to go. Also, if you’re looking for more unusual colors such as fuchsia ties or chartreuse green maybe some orange tones, Hermès will likely have a shade that you can get. Also, if you’re a Wall Street banker or if you work in finance and you want to fit in with your company culture, an Hermès tie is certainly the way to do that. That being said, personally, I’m not a big fan of whimsical motifs on ties and I prefer different textures so Hermes ties are not the ideal tie for me. I have a bunch of them including vintage ones and new ones but frankly, I don’t wear them a whole lot anymore. The ones I wear the most are probably the woven ties, they are somewhat simple and don’t look like a typical Hermès tie. With many other luxury products, you pay a lot for the name but you get average to mediocre quality. On the othe hand with an Hermès tie, you certainly pay for the name but you also get a quality product.

On top of that, genuine Hermes ties usually yield quite high prices even when they’re used. Of course, they have to be in pristine condition which ties rarely are if you actually wear them and on top of that, you have to prove that it’s actually a genuine product which can be very hard unless you have the specific receipt with a photo of the tie. Of course, if you give all the Hermès ties you don’t want any longer to a store, they have to mark them up and ultimately, you don’t get much for used Hermes ties anyways. Also if you’re shorter than 6 foot or 183 centimeters ,Hermès ties may be too long for you and all you can do is tie a really big knot which may often not work with your head size. Also if you’re really tall men and you want more variety in your ties, Hermes is not the right place for you. I also think they’re not worth buying used unless you know very well what you’re doing otherwise, you may pay top dollar for what turns out to be a fake. Personally, I also like ties to have different widths, my favorite width is about nine centimeters or three and a half inches and it’s not a niche served by Hermès at all.

Also building up an entire Hermes tie collection can be rather expensive. If you buy 12 ties you’re already down more than $2,000. Now they certainly use high quality materials including their silk but when I was looking for silks for our Fort Belvedere ties, I met Weavers who would actually produce jacquard woven silks for Hermes and we get ourselves from the same vendor at the same quality standards yet Fort Belvedere ties cost a lot less especially if you buy more and get the volume discount.

Hermès on the other hand doesn’t offer any volume discount. At the end of the day, to me personally, Hermes ties are mostly not worth it simply because I prefer a 9 centimeter width and I prefer different textures. On top of that, I want ties in different lengths because depending on an outfit and the rise of my trousers I don’t always want a consistent tie length and Hermès is not able to deliver that to me.

That being said, if you’re about 6 foot tall or 180 centimeters, Hermes ties will work for you in height and if you like their motifs and their flashy colors it’s definitely an option for you. Bear in mind that you can always sell them at a higher price if you don’t like them anymore of course only if you can prove that it’s a genuine product and not a fake. To learn how you can identify the real deal Hermes tie from a fake, please check out this video here soon. in today’s outfit I’m of course wearing an Hermès tie however it’s not a typical printed one but a jacquard woven one in a larger herringbone with yellow and grey it changes the color with the light in a very sophisticated way and because of that I liked the tie quite a lot it ties a nice knot and it’s overall a good product that being said it’s a vintage tie and they no longer produce this anymore I’m combining it with a typical Finance or Wall Street banker outfit that consists of a white soft striped dress shirt with French cuffs and wearing gold monkey fist knot cuff links from Fort Belvedere as well as a ring with a citrine stone that is also yellow gold it works well with the cufflinks the suit is from Ralph Lauren purple label it is kind of power-suit inspired with a softer silhouette it was made by Chester Barrie several years ago and it is a typical business suit in the sense that it has these kind of rope stripes that are bold they’re light on a navy background it is double-breasted with wide lapels that have a certain amount of belly the pants are cuffed and pleated the socks are shadow striped in yellow and blue so they work together and create some contrast to the black oxford shoes at the same time they pick up the yellow tones of the tie and a citrine ring the Hermes tie is no longer available and neither is a suit but you can still find the monkey fist knot cufflinks the white linen pocket square the TV fold as well as the boutonniere and the socks in our shop right here